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leading the air assault on libyan air defense and assets on the ground, the u.s. will pull back and hand over command and control to someone. when? >> we anticipate this transition to take place in a matter of days and not a matter of weeks. >> reporter: the u.s. role will then shift to providing logistical support while the uk, france, italy and other countries enforce the no-fly zone. but no one will say how long that will last. >> i wouldn't speculate in terms of length at this particular point in time. >> reporter: after all, the no-fly zone over iraq ended from the end of gulf war i to the beginning of gulf war ii, 11 years. >>> there is now growing international disagreement over the u.s.-led attacks. norway with drew its planes because it was unsure about which country was in charge. meanwhile, russian prime minister vladimir putin railed against the air strikes as outside meddling, saying it is, quote, reminiscent of a medieval call for a crusade when someone called on others to go and liberate something. >>> and be sure to stay with abc news all day as we continue our c
. >>> good morning, again, everyone. thanks for spending the week with us. it's been good having david muir here with us. we're going to get to japan in a moment. >> so much news this morning. >>> we're also tracking a story we broke at abc news. an air traffic controller sleeping on the job at a major airport, while two planes were landing. this morning, we learn how many airports rely on just one person to guide your plane in. >>> and did you hear this? elizabeth taylor late to her own funeral, by design. she wanted it that way. to be late to her own funeral. we have more details about her private service. actor colin farrell, joining family and friends. >> love that detail about her arriving late. >>> we're going to get to the breaking news this morning, what could be a catastrophic nuclear situation in japan. the prime minister speaking just moments ago about the new and perhaps the biggest breach yet in one of the nuclear reactor cores. neal karlinsky is tracking what the prime minister said moments ago. he has the latest from tokyo. neal, what did you hear? >> reporter: david, the pri
. >> with us now here in our washington studios is chuck advance, a veteran of 14 years with the secret service who was assigned to the detail that guarded president ford and who is now a partner in a private company specializing in a personal security issue. chuck, i know you wanted me to make the point that you are not here as a spokesman for the secret service but it is, obviously clear that spokesmen for the secret service don't appear on fwigs and you are a man who has spent many years with the service. we would like to take a look with you of that same piece of videotape that we saw just a moment ago. this time we're going to look at it in slow motion. i would appreciate, chuck, if you would give us the benefit of explaining to us what went right and what went wrong. in fact, some thing were done right but there must have been some things that went terribly wrong. let's take a look at the videotape and would you comment. >> i think you're looking at it from just about the viewpoint of the assailant. you're watching from his direction. the president came out. he's waving to the crowd, as h
gays have a right to do it. >>> terror attack a gunman shouting in arabic opens fire on u.s. troops at an airport in germany. >>> and, made in america. the family who said we could take away everything in their house made overseas, stunned by the truth. tonight, we show them how it looks when we buy only from workers here at home. >>> good evening. they are our parents, our neighbors and we learned today that by the millions they are vulnerable to a kind of invisible elder abuse. it was all brought home by the original all-american kid in the old time movies, mickey rooney who is now 90 years old. he silenced the room on capitol hill of his story of financial abuse, bullying and shake. adding, if it can happen to him, it can happen to anyone. and abc's claire shipman watched it all today. >> reporter: diane, it is estimated that as many as 3.5 million americans are victims of elder abuse. it does have a broad definition. it can be physical abuse, neglect, sheer theft, which is what mickey rooney talked about in his wrenching testimony, where he said all of them can cause devastating
will the u.s. lead the quest to crush gadhafi's forces? >>> severe spring weather. one of california's biggest rainmaker ever. spawning blizzards and tornadoes across the country. >>> and dancing debut. kirstie alley, even the karate kid, make their quest for the mirrorball trophy. >>> good morning. the no-fly zone in libya appears easier to enforce this morning after another round of military might. >> here, now, are the latest developments from libya. u.s.-led air strikes lit up the skies over tripoli for a third night. >> but the american military commanders are looking to hand over control of this operation as soon as possible. >> president obama says, while moammar gadhafi needs to go, the libyan leader is not the target of the air strikes. emily schmidt begins our coverage this morning in washington. good morning, emily. >> reporter: rob and peggy, good morning to you. moammar gadhafi has kept an uncharacteristically low profile the last couple of days. no signs of him amidst all the signs of an expanding no-fly zone. for yet another day, coalition forces are targeting libya. a
the radiation and right up to the gates of the leaking nuclear plant and he asked to us check him with our geiger counter. >> under the hood. did you have the hood up? >> yes. as you approach the actual power plant itself you begin to feel more and more there. >> reporter: did anyone try to stop you? >> they were making the symbol like this which is -- >> reporter: an incredibly brave journa journey, though. not the smartest one. they believe at least a partial meltdown is going on, and some of the rods have begun to melt. >> we're going to bring in physicist michio kaku. when you hear about what is being reported, the multiple meltdown. what does it mean for radiation levels in japan and the people there? >> i think we're going to see more uncontrolled releases of radiation. at unit two, radiation are 100 times above normal level. workers had to be evacuated. you will get a lethal dose in just a few hours. what it means, water is in contact with melted fuel. melted fuel releases iodine in large quantities and that's what we find in units two and three. i think the facility has been low-ba
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? >> at least she's coming out of the penalty to be with us. good morning, america. we have david muir with us, as george continues to take time off. you know what we're going to do this morning? we're going to celebrate elizabeth taylor's life. and our colleague, barbara walters, shares her memories of the icon. and we'll have a look at her jaw-dropping jewels. and the men in her life that lavished her with those jewels. >>> also coming up in this first half hour, what critics are calling a political stunt. this is out of japan this morning. tokyo's governor downing a glass of tap water, just 24 hours after that water was called radioactive. can it really shift this quickly? >>> we're going to start with the wild weather overnight all across the country. sam will have the forecast in a moment. but first, matt gutman joins us from westmoreland county, pennsylvania. >> reporter: good morning. this is a roof tile. that's the only part of this roof that's left. in 15 seconds of terror, residents here tell me that the entire neighborhood was shaking. porches up off the street. houses like this, ma
and the economy in the u.s. >> reporter: back on television this morning, mommar gadhafi, staying put. that's why all eyes will be on the stock market this morning. after gas hikes at the pump. now talk of $4 a gallon. this morning, nervous investors on wall street and everyday americans on main street, are watching it. rising oil prices, translating to rising gas prices at the pump. the average price of a gallon of regular in this country, $3.38 a gallon. up 20 cents in one week. up 68 cents in a year. as gas prices go up, stock prices are falling. those stocks directly impact so many american 401(k)s, finally starting to recoup what was lost in the recession. what's behind it? >> unrest in libya is causing an increase in oil prices because of potential supply disruptions. it hits right to the consumer wallet. and has a direct and immediate impact on confidence. >> reporter: that unrest is sending oil to $99.63 a barrel. topping $100 a barrel in overnight trading. and libya's mommar gadhafi remains defiant, after telling our christiane amanpour this week, he is staying. americans across this cou
's the order for millions as radiation levels spike. >>> mission accomplished? u.s. strikes on libya would soon be over. but overnight, gadhafi says he will win. >>> and powerful, spring storms spawn tornados in the heartland, as a system now targets the northeast. >>> good morning. we begin this morning with some breaking news out of tokyo, japan. that city of about 7 million people has a new concern about radiation right now. >> and it's flowing out of every tap. new tests on tokyo's water have found it to be two times above the limit for radioactive iodine considered safe for infants. parents are now being told to keep it away from youngsters. but the level of iodine is said to pose no immediate health risk to adults. >> and broccoli was added to the list of vegetables taken from around the nuclear plant. the fda has halted all imports from that region. we'll have more coming up. >>> meanwhile, there is word of evacuation of the workers from the fukushima nuclear plant. that evacuation came amid come black smoke from the reactor. it could still be weeks or months before power lines could pow
for gadhafi, to get him into exile. well get into that with the u.s. bourd to the united nations, susan rice. >>> first, we go to jake tapper at the white house. >> reporter: good morning, george. the president said a confluence of events compelled the u.s. to act to stop a massacre. a moral and a strategic case to act. and broad support for reaction throughout the world. but, george, that did not stop the president's critics. the president said they were a special set of circumstances. >> the united states has worked with our international partners to mobilize a broad coalition, secure an international mandate to protect civilians, stop an advancing army, prevent a massacre and establish a no-fly zone. >> reporter: also clearly informing his decision were lessons from two previous presidents. why would the u.s. not militarily seek regime change in libya? >> to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. >> reporter: but also the responsibility to prevent a massacre, as did not happen in the former yugoslavia during bill clinton's tenure in 1995. >> as president, i refuse to wait for images of
of state hillary clinton says the u.s. may even prosecute gadhafi for the 1988 pan am bombing. he's suspected of personally ordering that attack. >> as the u.s. weighs military action, there's concern about the conflicts and the harmful impact they'll have on the u.s. economy. >> emily schmidt has the latest on that from washington. emily? >> reporter: in libya, change and uncertainty carries a growing cost. in the years ahead, libya could become a peaceful democracy. or it could face protractive civil war. or it could descend into chaos. the stakes are high. >> reporter: the u.n. estimates more than 1,000 people have died. libya's oil chief says production is cut in half. guards at one of the nation's largest oil facilities say they are not taking sides in the conflict. u.s. consumers are feeling the pinch. food prices in january rose the fastest they have since 2008. oil topped $100 a barrel yesterday. gas is up 20 cents a gallon this week. >> it's killing us. we don't go anywhere but work and home. >> we could see gasoline between $4 and $5 a gallon by memor
's agenda today and he will address the nation tonight to define u.s. priorities in confronting the gadhafi regime. >> also japan's nuclear crisis got even shakier this morning when the country was hit by yet another serious quake. also new reports of damaged fuel rods at the fukushima nuclear plant. we'll have the latest. >> and we'll lighten the mood later this half hour. march madness is not really madness to one talented teen out there. i'll introduce to you a guy who keeps tabs on college basketball like nobody else. you won't believe how much he's done at such a young age. >> you're in first place with the competition. >> not bragging yet. >>> first let's get down to the headlines. there are reports rebels have taken moammar gadhafi's hometown of sirte. >> that would be a big victory for the reb. s. they were aided by international air strikes overnight. >> continued u.s. involvement in the operation may be a tough sell. so the administration is now taking its case directly to the people today. abc's david kerley reports. >> do you think libya posed an actual or imminent threat to the
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13